Celebrating Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne, a pioneer missionary of the Society of the Sacred Heart, who came to St. Charles, Missouri, from France and founded the first free school west of the Mississippi in September 1818.

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Bicentennial

  • Rose Philippine Duchesne by Hugo von Bouvard
    Rose Philippine Duchesne, Oil on Canvas, by Hugo von Bouvard
  • St. Rose Philippine Duchesne icon by Milton Frenzel (Villa Duchesne in St. Louis, Mo.)
    St. Rose Philippine Duchesne icon by Milton Frenzel (Villa Duchesne in St. Louis, Mo.)
  • St. Rose Philippine Duchesne, Oil on Panel, by Margaret Mary Nealis, RSCJ
    St. Rose Philippine Duchesne, Oil on Panel, by Margaret Mary Nealis, RSCJ
  • St. Rose Philippine Duchesne mural (La Colline School in Haiti)
    St. Rose Philippine Duchesne mural (La Colline School in Haiti)
  • St. Rose Philippine Duchesne, Stained Glass, Most Sacred Heart Church (Eureka, Mo.)
    St. Rose Philippine Duchesne, Stained Glass, Most Sacred Heart Church (Eureka, Mo.)
St. Louis Review
The St. Louis Review featured the celebration of St. Rose Philippine's feast day in St. Charles, Mo.  Read more
The Pearls (from left), Bob, Virginia and Bob’s daughter, Janet
The Pearl children, Virginia and Bob, grew up in early 20th century Kansas hearing stories about their great-grandmother’s devotion to a French religious they still call Mother Duchesne. Read more
St. Rose Philippine Brochure
A brochure detailing the life of St. Rose Philippine Duchesne is available to download in English, French and Spanish. Read more
The Bicentennial Prayer
Spirit of the living God, you first breathed over the waters of creation, and one day you breathed a passion into the heart of Philippine Duchesne. ...   A prayer for the Bicentennial has been written for the occasion and translated into French and Spanish. Read more

Quotes from Philippine

Journal - 1819

"It would be very wrong for us ever to lack confidence in Divine Providence after all the proofs we have had of God’s care of us: a small sack of rice sufficed for the entire year, and we ate rice frequently. Coffee and sweetening were supplied by the kind Ursulines of New Orleans."
~ Journal